Wednesday, December 3, 2014

Whatcha' Gonna Do?

When I get sad. . .not depressed, mind you, just heart wrenchingly sad.  You see. . . when something happens that affects someone I love and I am powerless to do anything to help the person [by virtue of distance and health] I get sad.

And I do three things. Always.
-I ugly cry. Because my heart is breaking for a loved one and it makes my heart ache for them. And we all know what an ugly cry is.
-I pray. Recently it feels as tho' my whole days have been taken up in praying. Does it help? Me, I suppose. I have some idea of whether or not God answers my prayers, but it brings me a small amount of peace to hand over the awfulness of something that is troubling me for another.
-And I cook.

I cook a lot. It seems to be the only thing that works because I am alone all day with my thoughts and powerlessness against it all.  The cooking is always from scratch because it takes longer and occupies my hands and my eyes and my mind and no one wants Mom snarfing in dinner, right?

I know most of you know of what am speaking about - that one of our own is suffering and so far away, but it is not my story to tell on her behalf right now. Until it goes up on her blog, I respect her quietness and pray she keeps the strength that all of us have come to admire. Although it is up on Facebook, and she called me yesterday, she has many, so many, blog friends that aren't on Facebook that I don't want to run the risk of telling them anything until she does through her blog.

Make sense? I hope so. I suck at this kind of thing, especially when I am sad, but I am trying.  I just needed to come here and talk, about anything.

Steven came home last night and found me in tears but preparing dinner. At first he thought it was the pain, but then realized this was worse.  He told me to sit down, forget about dinner and we would just eat leftovers.

Nope, I had to get up and do something.  So with Evelyn's assistance in the kitchen I made up a few new recipes.  I was too exhausted to look up recipes, but having never made these dishes before I thought I would just wing it with the knowledge I have on hand. . .my sketch memory and sad skills.

I knew we had about 2.5-3 lbs of dark meat turkey leftover, turkey stock I made Sunday and a few blocks of cheddar cheese.

I don't know why but I thought turkey burgers and macaroni and cheese sounded like a meal. So I used my Ninja [mini food processor] and minced the cooked turkey, celery and onion for the burgers. I followed the same recipe I use for salmon cakes and added 2 eggs, about a cup of Italian bread crumbs and then veered off of that with 2 heaping tablespoons of turkey stock [it had congealed, so it was probably more like a half of a cup,who knows] and a heaping teaspoon of sage.  I mixed it all in my stand mixer and Evelyn made patties.

While she was making the patties I used the base of another recipe I use that is a roux to begin the macaroni and cheese.  I melted 5 tablespoons of butter in a pan, adding a teaspoon of salt and 3/4 teaspoon of pepper [more or less]. I added a heaping quarter cup of flour and mixed that until thickened. To that I poured in milk - I don't know how much, but I would guess 3 or 4 cups? I just poured until I had a nice thick sauce which I added 3/4 lb of ninja'd [I love that thing] sharp cheddar cheese and about a cup of mozzarella. I stirred until it was melted and had the sauce to mix with about 8 oz of cooked elbow macaroni.  Put that in a greased baking dish, sprinkled with paprika, covered and cooked at 350 degrees for about 45 minutes. My family doens't like it overly brown, so I didn't remove the lid.

While that baked, I fried the turkey burgers in a scant amount of oil on medium heat.  When they were thoroughly browned on both sides, I drained them on paper towel and let them sit.

When the macaroni and cheese was done, I took it out to rest and popped the burgers in the oven on 250 degrees to keep warm.  The turkey was already cooked from Thanksgiving so no worries with making sure they were cooked all the way through.

I also served the last of the Cracker Barrel style green beans and ham as a side.  I made these for Thanksgiving and that is what Evelyn calls them, Cracker Barrel beans [we haven't eaten there in 5 years, so how she remembers?] To me they taste like my grandma's homemade, and again, it is another recipe I couldn't be bothered to research. I just winged it.  I snapped two lbs of green beans [took me an hour - I don't miss the days of doing bushels of these during canning season for my grandma] rinsed them and put them in the slow cooker with 2 cups of chicken broth and 6 oz of diced cured country ham/fat back/pork hocks - take your pick. I used the cured ham. Set on low and those were some of the best dang green beans I have ever had. And easy. Just cook them until soft. Steven did have to put a cup of water in at two intervals, but our slow cooker is pretty hot.

I served the turkey burgers on hamburger rolls with the sides.  Steven put cranberry sauce on his, while Evelyn ate mayonnaise on hers.  I was too tired to eat, but I would lean towards my homemade cranberry sauce because it is more tart than sweet and tastes really good with turkey.

Sorry to bore you all, but it's honestly? I just didn't know what else to do and it seemed to make sense to come here and write down recipes.

Hugs and love to all of you. I can't begin to tell you how much you mean to me, and if you knew the heartache I have for one of own I am sure you could begin to understand better.

See ya' on the flipside. Janine




7 comments:

RunNRose said...

Good for you to figure out a way to cope with your despair! I am going to try the green beans recipe for sure. I am always glad to see a post from you. You are one amazing "young" lady. To me you are young! I wish I could fix the problems.

Gypsy said...

Cooking from scratch and making it up as I go along always helps to take my mind off problems.

Life isn't fair - I've been in relatively good health for most of my life, while my beautiful and talented and sweet natured daughter has had health problems since her late teens. I don't understand it at all.

biz319 said...

My lovely Skip - it pained me to call you on the phone, but I knew it was the only way you needed to find out - not just logging onto the computer.

What you did? Is what I call Kitchen Therapy. Even as Tony laid sleeping and dying not 10 feet from the kitchen, I made two loaves of bread, banana bread, apple almond bread, lasagna soup and chicken noodle soup.

Just the process of chopping the veggies, kneading the dough - it helped me more than I even realized and I was able to nourish the family and friends who stopped by to visit.

Thank you for being there for me - I will never forget it. :D

Hugs and Love :D

Susan Flett Swiderski said...

I know what you mean. Two of my closest friends are facing some bad medical stuff right now. One's gonna have a team of doctors do multiple surgeries on her on New Years Eve, and the other is having extensive surgery in early January for oral cancer. We'll be going to visit her and her husband to see in the new year, so I'm cooking like mad to take food up there with us. Sometimes, keeping busy is all we can do. And cooking is therapeutic, not to mention much appreciated by all the people who get to eat the fruits of our labor.

Take care, sweetie.

12:34

Jill Thomas said...

Cooking and baking is healing and therapeutic for me also. I hope things work out in the best way. Prayers for you and yours.

SapphireBlue said...

If you care about someone, you can't help but feel their pain. It definitely requires trying to find something to do with your hands. I always do laundry when I'm upset.

Sending healing thoughts!!

RunNRose said...

Hi, Janine. I check every day for a post from you. Was able to discover the cause of this post through comments. No wonder you were upset. Yes, life is a gift, but sometimes things that happen suck. Meanwhile, I hope you are still hanging in there. You never did tell us about the long trip with Evelyn to check out the college.